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Drug-Target Interaction

Drug

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PubChem ID:5213
Structure:
Synonyms:
22888-70-6
3,5,7-trihydroxy-2-[3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-2-(hydroxymethyl)-2,3-di
3,5,7-trihydroxy-2-[3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-2-(hydroxymethyl)-2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-6-yl]-2,3-dihydro-4H-chromen-4-one
AC1L1JUL
AKOS000546856
BAS 00015476
C07610
HMS1608M08
HMS2232P05
MLS000028529
MolPort-001-913-435
NCGC00018179-02
NCGC00018179-03
NCGC00018179-04
NCGC00089738-02
NCGC00089738-03
Silibinin
SILYBIN
Silymarin
SMR000058272
SR-01000000093
SR-01000000093-9
STK396325
TULIP001427
ATC-Codes:

Target

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Uniprot ID:MK03_HUMAN
Synonyms:
ERK-1
ERT2
Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1
Insulin-stimulated MAP2 kinase
MAP kinase 1
MAPK 1
Microtubule-associated protein 2 kinase
Mitogen-activated protein kinase 3
p44-ERK1
p44-MAPK
EC-Numbers:2.7.11.24
Organism:Homo sapiens
Human
PDB IDs:2ZOQ
Structure:
2ZOQ

Binding Affinities:

Ki: Kd:Ic 50:Ec50/Ic50:
----

References:

11759294
Differential responses of skin cancer-chemopreventive agents silibinin, quercetin, and epigallocatechin 3-gallate on mitogenic signaling and cell cycle regulators in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells.. N Bhatia; C Agarwal; R Agarwal (2001) Nutrition and cancer display abstract
Silibinin, quercetin, and epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG) have been shown to be skin cancer-preventive agents, albeit by several different mechanisms. Here, we assessed whether these agents show their cancer-preventive potential by a differential effect on mitogenic signaling molecules and cell cycle regulators. Treatment of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells with these agents inhibited the activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor and the downstream adapter protein Shc, but only silibinin showed a marked inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase-extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 and -2 activation. In terms of cell cycle regulators, silibinin treatment showed an induction of Cip1/p21 and Kip1/p27 together with a significant decrease in cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-4, CDK2, and cyclin D1. Quercetin treatment, however, resulted in a moderate increase in Cip1/p21 with no change in Kip1/p27 and a decrease in CDK4 and cyclin D1. EGCG treatment also led to an induction of Cip1/p21 but no change in Kip1/27, CDK2, and cyclin D1 and a decrease in CDK4 only at low doses. Treatment of cells with these agents resulted in a strong dose- and time-dependent cell growth inhibition. A high dose of silibinin and low and high doses of quercetin and EGCG also led to cell death by apoptosis, suggesting that a lack of their inhibitory effect on mitogen-activated protein kinase-extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 and -2 activation possibly "turns on" an apoptotic cell death response associated with their cancer-preventive and anticarcinogenic effects. Together, these results suggest that silibinin, quercetin, and EGCG exert their cancer-preventive effects by differential responses on mitogenic signaling and cell cycle regulators.