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Drug-Target Interaction

Drug

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PubChem ID:516872
Structure:
Synonyms:
(cyanosulfanyl)potassium
14314-32-0
170159-46-3
333-20-0
4495-15-2
60763-16-8
60763-16-8 (potassium-silver-CHNS[1:1:2])
77044-25-8
885624-03-3
AC1LANHS
AC1Q1TQA
AG-F-12273
AI3-28747
Arterocyn
Aterocyn
Caswell No. 703
CCRIS 4041
CHEBI:30951
CID516872
CID9522
CPD-5381
EINECS 206-370-1
EINECS 262-409-2
EPA Pesticide Chemical Code 068201
I14-7087
KSCN
Kyonate
LS-152727
MolPort-000-158-374
OR5319
Potassium isothiocyanate
Potassium rhodanate
potassium rhodanide
Potassium silver bis(thiocyanate)
Potassium silver thiocyanate
Potassium sulfocyanate
POTASSIUM THIOCYANATE
POTASSIUM THIOCYANATE, ACS
Potassium thiocyanide
Rhocya
Rhodanide
Rodanca
Thio-cara
Thiocyanic acid, potassium salt
Thiocyanic acid, potassium salt (1:1)
thiocyanic acid, potassium silver(1) salt (2:1:1)
Thiocyanic acid, potassium silver(1+) salt (2:1:1)

Target

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Uniprot ID:PCKGC_HUMAN
Synonyms:
PEPCK-C
Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, cytosolic [GTP]
Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase
EC-Numbers:4.1.1.32
Organism:Homo sapiens
Human
PDB IDs:1KHB 1KHE 1KHF 1KHG 1M51 1NHX 2GMV
Structure:
2GMV

Binding Affinities:

Ki: Kd:Ic 50:Ec50/Ic50:
----

References:

2253346
Kinetic measurement of bicarbonate in serum by thiocyanate inhibition of wheat germ phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase.. R R Punzalan; G F Johnson; B A Cunningham; R D Feld (1990) Clinical chemistry display abstract
We describe a kinetic enzymic method for serum bicarbonate analysis, using wheat germ phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.31) coupled through oxaloacetate reduction with NADH in the presence of malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.37). Inhibition with potassium thiocyanate yielded first-order kinetics with respect to bicarbonate over the concentration range of 0-45 mmol/L. The inhibitor was chosen by evaluating reaction data in the presence of different anions, with use of a monoexponential model. Criteria for first-order kinetics included a constant reaction half-life over the concentration range and SDest for the model comparable with the magnitude of spectrophotometric noise. We compared our kinetic method (y) with an automated ion-selective electrode method (x), obtaining the regression relationship y = 0.97x + 1.2 mmol/L (r = 0.991; n = 77; mean = 25.5 mmol/L; y = 25.3 mmol/L). Within-run precision from duplicates was 3.1% (mean = 25.2 mmol/L; n = 72). Total analytical precision (n = 12) was 9.4% (mean = 15 mmol/L) for the low control and 4.3% (mean = 32 mmol/L) for the high control. We conclude that the kinetic assay allows use of large serum-to-reagent ratios (1:100) and smaller amounts of NADH than an equilibrium assay. The assay is suitable for automated kinetic analysis.